Category: Knee Surgery

The Common Causes Of Severe Knee Surgery Pain – Simon Coffey

Most people experience knee surgery pain at some point in their lives. Sports, exercise, and other activities can cause muscle strains, tendinitis, and more serious injuries to ligaments and cartilage. For some, knee pain can be so severe that it limits daily activities. For others, mild knee pain may be a chronic hindrance to the active lifestyle they desire. In either case, chances are that you’re dealing with a knee problem that shouldn’t be ignored.

knee-surgery-simon-coffey

Knee Ligament Injuries
The ligaments are what connect your thigh bone to your lower leg bones. They hold your bones together and keep the knee stable. Knee ligament sprains and tears are very common sports injuries and can occur to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Any of these injuries can result in severe knee pain and could require surgery.

Knee Cartilage Tears
Other injuries, including tears, can take place in the cartilage of the knee. Cartilage is a semi-hard (tough, but flexible) tissue that covers the end of your bones. Knee cartilage comprises the two menisci on either side of the joint: the medial meniscus, located on the inside of the knee and the lateral meniscus, positioned on the outside of the knee. You’ve probably heard the phrase “meniscus tear”. A tear in the knee cartilage is a common injury, and typically requires surgery.

Arthritis of the Knee
Arthritis is a common cause of severe knee pain and disability. Unfortunately, arthritis is a chronic degenerative condition that can eventually require surgery. The three most common types of arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis, post-traumatic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. In the case of any of these three, you may experience stiffness and swelling, and it may be hard to bend your knee.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Knee
Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes the tissue around the joint to become inflamed and thickened. Chronic inflammation often leads to damage and loss of cartilage. Rheumatoid arthritis represents only about 10 percent to 15 percent of all arthritis cases.

Post-Traumatic Arthritis
Post-traumatic arthritis can result after a serious knee injury, including bone fractures and ligament tears. These injuries can damage the cartilage in your knee over time and lead to pain, swelling, and stiffness.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee
The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which is a progressive wearing of the cartilage in the knee joint. It occurs more frequently in individuals 50 and older. After 50, the impact of osteoarthritis can worsen due to accumulated use and the wearing down of cartilage that occurs with age. Osteoarthritis of the knee causes pain, limited range of motion, stiffness of the knee, swelling of the joint, tenderness, deformity and weakness.

Causes of osteoarthritis include age, weight, genetics, previous injuries, infections, and illness (such as a tumor or gout). Osteoarthritis can also be caused by sports injuries and wear and tear resulting from physical work in occupations, such as construction and manufacturing.

Diagnosing Knee Pain
Doctors diagnose arthritis and other knee problems using x-rays and a physical evaluation. You will be asked about your pain level, knee flexibility and function, and general mobility. Medical professionals will also use special tests to identify the type of arthritis affecting your knee.

Treating Knee Pain from Arthritis
Knee pain usually becomes worse as arthritis progresses. Common treatments include: weight loss, strengthening exercises, wrapping, and pain relievers—such as acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

While osteoarthritis is the most common surgical patient diagnosis, those with severe pain from any type of arthritis may benefit from surgery, including a partial or total knee replacement. It’s crucial to discuss and explore all treatment options with your doctor before opting for surgery.

Source By – healthline

Revision Total Knee Replacement

Most knee replacements provide very good long term function for many years after implantation. The most recent figures from The AOANJRR (Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement  Registry) reveal that the revision rate for Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty at 15 years is 7%. Most of these replacements have failed either as a result of infection or premature wear.

After a long period of time, a knee replacement can wear out. Sometimes the procedure to correct this problem is as simple as changing the polyethylene bearing insert in the knee – much like a retread on a car tyre. Other times a much more extensive procedure is required where all the major components of the knee are exchanged. Each of these procedures can renew the life of knee replacement for another 10-15 years.

Below is an example of a worn out polyethylene bearing which was able to be swapped out for a new one.

Another example of a much more extensive procedure appears below.

knee-arthroscopy

The decision as to whether to do the more minor operation or the larger one is best left to your specialist total knee replacement surgeon who will consider the pros and cons of each operation.

Knee Replacement surgeons, Sydney

For those who suffer severe and debilitating pain from osteoarthritis or injury of the knee, there is always the option to consult the expertise of orthopaedic or knee replacement surgeons. Sydney has a number of knee replacement Orthopaedic surgeons though few capable of safely completing the simultaneous replacement of both knees.

bilateral-knee-replacement

One knee replacement surgeon in Sydney with experience in replacing both knees in one procedure is Dr. Simon Coffey. He is practicing in both Penrith and Macquarie University, Sydney.

Patients eligible for bilateral simultaneous knee replacement most often suffer from the osteoarthritic degeneration of both knees. Both knees are required to be equally dysfunctional and painful for the procedure to be considered. This is due to the fact that the progress of the disease can stabilise once strength is restored to the knee operated on. This post-operative improvement can often delay the need for a second knee replacement by several years.

If a patient meets the criteria for simultaneous bilateral  knee replacement, the benefits are twofold in comparison to having two separate operations.

The first is that the recovery time of the rehabilitation process is reduced. The advantage of a single recovery period also lessens the work-related burdens of asking for two extended blocks of sick leave. Asking for two lots of sick leave can lead to secondary financial issues as well.

The second benefit is the reduced cost of undergoing one procedure as opposed to having to pay for two.

However, due to the longer duration, higher potential for blood loss and cardiovascular complications of the surgery, the overall health of the patient needs to be robust in order for the operation to go ahead.

The preconditions a patient must meet to be eligible for a bilateral simultaneous knee replacement are:

  • Under 80 years of age
  • No history of systemic cardiovascular disease
  • No history of Kidney disease
  • No history of Diabetes
  • Presently experiencing bilateral debilitating knee pain

To be certain patients meet these criteria, thorough preoperative tests need to be undertaken. Other personal considerations like the impact on your work commitments and support network are also an important part of making your decision.

If you experience severe and debilitating pain in both knees, then there is a knee replacement surgeon in Sydney who can help you investigate your options. With a successful record for knowing and picking the right candidates to receive this life-changing operation, Dr. Simon Coffey is one of the very few Sydney based surgeons able to help.